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Policy

Kids Organized to Protect the Environment

Kids Organized to Protect the Environment

“The next year, students learned that developers intended to cover the stream and build big box stores, office buildings and a parking lot over the block. However, they were convinced the stream could be rehabilitated and would be an asset to the businesses.”

Now is the time to bring [beavers] back

Now is the time to bring [beavers] back

“[Jim Ehleringer] felt eradicating them would not accomplish much other than degrading the ecology of the canyon, which had been a research natural area administered by the U.S. Forest Service for more than a decade.”

Simmering conflicts over canyon land

Simmering conflicts over canyon land

"'This is all a great conversation to have, more broadly,' said Carl Fisher, executive director of Save Our Canyons. 'But to just kind of unilaterally run legislation to end what has been over a century of stewardship and protection of mountain and water resources immediately adjacent to the most populous areas of the state of Utah... really jeopardizes the Wasatch Mountains and public health.'"

Development in canyons destroy legacy

Development in canyons destroy legacy
"Salt Lake City’s greatest legacy is the protection of our precious water resources. I hope that legislators will see HB135 for what it is — needless state overreach with no benefit — except for a handful of property owners in the Cottonwood canyons — but with the very real potential to forever jeopardize our watershed, on which we all depend."

Cities defined by water

Cities defined by water
"This type of flood management strategy more closely mimics the natural water cycle–an approach called 'low-impact development.' Also known as 'green infrastructure,' it means designing systems that allow urban runoff to naturally infiltrate the soil instead of channeling it into pipes and storm drains."

A River Runs Through It

A River Runs Through It
“When urban rivers are forced underground into piping, that disrupts their whole behavioral pattern. But by daylighting these rivers and creating a more natural ecology, it makes the rivers more desirable. You then find that people actually care about and want to look after the river a lot more."

Urban Streams See Light Again

Urban Streams See Light Again
"When the little stream and its tributary in the Rock Creek area of northwest Washington were channeled into a buried pipe, they carried away not only the runoff from this leafy section of the city but also pollution, which would make its way to the beleaguered Chesapeake Bay. Other cities saw similar problems. What's more, paving and piping often make flooding worse.

That's why in recent years many cities have been undoing the past century's drainage projects, uncovering or "daylighting" buried streams."

Daylighting Streams

Daylighting Streams
"The benefit of the growing trend is perhaps best articulated through a statement on the Web site of Springfield, MO’s own Jordan Creek daylighting project. 'The project promotes the idea that urban streams are a valuable resource to be enjoyed rather than a nuisance to be tunneled underground.'"

Creek feud boils

Creek feud boils
"Scores of east-end property owners say they've been unfairly blamed for polluting streams that meander out of the mountains. And now, the residents who live along the water's edge are riled over a City Council decision - in a bid to eradicate erosion - to restrict new construction and other ground disturbances within 100 feet of creek banks."