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watershed

Monitoring Salt Lake County streams

Monitoring Salt Lake County streams

“Reliable water quality data is critical to understanding the overall health of our watershed, specifically how development and other landscape-altering activities can impact the health of our streams.”

Assessing stream health

Assessing stream health

“Streams are dynamic. In a healthy stream system, stream banks move as erosive forces shape and reshape the channel and floodplain. Stream bank and bed mobility is a natural phenomenon. A stream is considered “stable” when the water flow and sediments carried by the channel do not cause excessive changes to the width, depth, cross-sectional area, and slope of the stream.”

Development in canyons destroy legacy

Development in canyons destroy legacy
"Salt Lake City’s greatest legacy is the protection of our precious water resources. I hope that legislators will see HB135 for what it is — needless state overreach with no benefit — except for a handful of property owners in the Cottonwood canyons — but with the very real potential to forever jeopardize our watershed, on which we all depend."

Why wood

Why wood
"Installed with one end extending out into the river, the structures catch the current to reduce its erosive force. This protects the bank and while providing healthier fish habitats. The newly built floodplain will be able to accommodate higher river flows, allowing floodwaters to slow down and deposit their beneficial sediments."