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Where the Waters Meet

By Wendy Wischer | WendyWischer.com

Created in collaboration with artist John Mack, Where the Waters Meet consists of three low-bridges that come together at a small platform approximately three feet above the ground. This temporary installation represents the three creeks, Red Butte, Emigration, and Parley’s Creeks, that flow underneath the site at 1300 South 800 West in the Salt Lake City neighborhood of Glendale.

The Three Creeks Wayfinding Installation design by Wendy Wischer and John Mack.

The Three Creeks Wayfinding Installation design by Wendy Wischer and John Mack.

The three, blue-painted pathways that merge together create a visual representation of the nearby Three Creeks Confluence. In addition, the piece represents the convergence of different cultures in the Glendale neighborhood. The platform, formed by the converging pathways, will function as an open community stage. From June to October, the temporary installation will become a gathering space and reminder of the three underground waterways that flow beneath the neighborhood.

The Seven Canyons Trust is hosting a community celebration on June 24th from 10AM to 1PM to commemorate the $1.2 million secured to fund the Three Creeks Confluence. The platform will transform into an “open mic” to invite residents to share poetry, music, story-telling and loveDANCEmore will host an improvisational dance jam. The event will be free and open to all.

 

About the Artists

As an Assistant Professor in Sculpture Intermedia at the University of Utah I have been very interested in collaborations dealing with the significance of water in the west and especially the watersheds of the Wasatch Mountains. Recently, I completed a permanent public art piece installed under the I-15 expressway at 1300 South, just blocks away from the Three Creeks Confluence. Flowing Currents is a visual abstraction that represents the waters that flow underneath the area, while also referencing the flow of traffic, wind and migration.

A placemaking sculpture to activate neglected space under the 1300 South underpass.

A placemaking sculpture to activate neglected space under the 1300 South underpass.

Last year, I installed a temporary piece at Cottonwood Pond in West Valley City. Braided Nexus was designed to assist with ecological restoration efforts and created temporary seats for residents, encouraging a community gathering place. Currently, I am working on a more permanent installation for the pond that will include boulders as seating and willow sculptures that will be planted in the water and eventually create habitat.

A temporary installation to provide native willow habitat, erosion control, and seating.

A temporary installation to provide native willow habitat, erosion control, and seating.

John uses traditional materials, such as wood and metal, often creating large abstract forms based on Science Fiction for his sculptural work. His use of traditional materials, as well as his experience with carpentry, are ideal for his current position as the Technical Director of the Pioneer Theatre where he builds a wide variety of functional stage sets.

Interactive stage built by John Mack for the Pioneer Theatre.

Interactive stage built by John Mack for the Pioneer Theatre.

Both John and I have a special interest in the natural environment and seek ways to use our creativity to perpetuate sustainable practices for future generations. This is an exciting project both for its importance at the Three Creek Confluence, as well as the potential for building bridges within a community – physically and metaphorically.


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